21 First Period Traditions From Around The World

2.

“You have a party thrown to celebrate your transition into womanhood where you don’t leave the house for three days, then get presents.”

You have a party thrown to celebrate your transition into womanhood where you don’t leave the house for three days, then get presents and a huge party (typically). You mustn’t be around children or men during your first period.

—Nyiko, South Africa

7.

“The family throws a big party.”

When a girl gets her first period, the family throws a big party because the girl becomes a woman.

—Maria, 28, Greece

9.

“When my mother found out, she insisted on taking me out to dinner.”

When my mother found out, she insisted on taking me out to dinner in a sort of celebration, but I was mortified at the thought. I went to appease her, but was uncomfortable the entire time.

—Anonymous, 18, US

11.

“The girl must promise not to look at any boys (even her father and brother) for a certain length of time.”

In my culture, when a girl gets her first period, her parents will consult a wise old medicine practitioner, who will tell you how to carry out her “party.” Each girl’s day will be personalized, using indicators that I would not know about.

The morning after the period starts, the girl must promise not to look at any boys (even her father and brother) for a certain length of time, all according to what the old wise people tell you. For some, it can last more than a week, when you can’t even go to school. This is apparently supposed to symbolize that you will protect yourself from boys (???).

After your sans-boy days are over, the girl will celebrate, inviting her friends and family to come over and have cakes, fruit, and rice.

—Anonymous, born in North America to South Indian parents

13.

“I was kind of embarrassed by the sheer number of people that came to visit me, even men!”

According to South Indian traditions, when you get your first period, they isolate you in a corner of a room. Nobody should touch you. You can have food only with salt, nothing else. And you have your own utensils. They do this for anywhere between three and nine days. I was supposed to do this for seven days, but I argued with my mom and did it for five because I was missing out on school.

On the first day they call all your relatives and family friends, and they all bless you and bring gifts, and do a ceremony. On the last day you take a special bath, and the next day you go to the temple and have another ceremony. They host dinner or lunch and then you’re back to normal. It is kind of like a celebration, but I hated it because I am a foodie and not having tasty food for four days made me angry 😂.

And I was kind of embarrassed by the sheer number of people that came to visit me, even men! I was 13 — imagine my embarrassment.

—Anonymous, 13, United Arab Emirates

15.

“It can become kind of awkward when your parents’ old friends all congratulate you.”

When you have your first period everyone starts to call you “signorina,” which means “miss” or “young lady,” and your relatives make sure that anybody who knows you gets informed about the good news. So it can become kind of awkward when your parents’ old friends all congratulate you in the strangest ways.

—Maria, 16, Italy

17.

“My mom told me to have someone else pour water over you in the bath during the first day of your first period to wash away the blood, impurities, and bad luck.”

I’m Filipino-American, and I’m not sure if these are superstitions common throughout the culture, but my mom told me to have someone else pour water over you in the bath during the first day of your first period to wash away the blood, impurities, and bad luck.

—Michele, US

21.

“My Sri Lankan grandmother ambushed me on the stairs…and handed me a $50 bill. Still the best period I’ve ever had.”

On the second day of my first period, my Sri Lankan grandmother ambushed me on the stairs. She told me that in Sri Lanka a girl’s first period is cause for celebration and handed me a $50 bill. Still the best period I’ve ever had.

—Malika, 23, Canada

Responses have been edited for length and clarity.

How does your family or community mark first periods? Let us know in the comments.

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